Has Downsizing Been What We Expected?

Has Downsizing Been What We Expected?

Believe it or not, we’ve lived in our new house for over six months now. Half a year! So we thought this would be a good time to check in on some of the goals we had for moving and downsizing to see what has met and exceeded our expectations – along with detailing some of the biggest challenges we’ve encountered along the way.

This is going to be long & detailed, because it feels like there’s a lot of ground to cover, and while this rundown will be pretty specific to our situation, I think it’ll still give you a good window into the realities of downsizing that you might also encounter if you were to go for it. And yes, it includes money details. And a chart. You know I love charts.

To Recap, Why Did We Move?

We’ve got a thorough explanation of our reasons for moving from Virginia to Florida in this post from February.

Continue reading Has Downsizing Been What We Expected? at Young House Love.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://www.younghouselove.com/what-is-it-like-to-downsize/

Making Giant Wooden Tree Rings

I made oversized tree rings for my Wood Shed walls. And when I saw oversized… I mean giant!

I have been dreaming of this project since March of 2020. So to see it complete, literally makes my heart flutter.

Things I used in this project:

To see how they all came together, check out the video above!

More links:

Hope you enjoy this build! You can come check out the Tree Rings in person when the Wood Shed opens.

See you on whatever I’m building next.

If you haven’t already, don’t forget to sign up at the top of this page for my newsletter so you don’t miss new projects!

(Most of the links listed above are affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for supporting me in this way.)

The post Making Giant Wooden Tree Rings appeared first on Wilker Do's.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://wilkerdos.com/2020/11/making-giant-wooden-tree-rings/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=making-giant-wooden-tree-rings

Holiday Gift Guides For Everyone On Your List (With Stuff Under $15, and even $9)

Holiday Gift Guides For Everyone On Your List (With Stuff Under $15, and even $9)

This year we got our gift guide post up a lot sooner than usual, because we’re highlighting tons of small makers and Black-owned businesses that we love, and we want to give those shops as much lead time as possible (heck, large stores seem to need more lead time than ever these days too). We also included a handful of tried & true items from larger companies that we’ve bought and loved (like a favorite tool or family game).

There’s stuff for grown-ups, kids, and a ton of budget-friendly ideas that are under $20, and even under $10 that would be great for teachers, neighbors, coworkers, or white elephant exchanges!

Gifts For Grown-Ups

Here’s what we’re loving, either firsthand items that we’ve personally bought and enjoyed – or things that we’re getting for friends & family (or hoping to find under the tree ourselves).

  1. This plant lover’s doormat makes me laugh so hard.

Continue reading Holiday Gift Guides For Everyone On Your List (With Stuff Under $15, and even $9) at Young House Love.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://www.younghouselove.com/2020-holiday-gift-guide/

Gas Vs Battery Chainsaws

Today I’m going to be talking about the difference between gas- and battery-powered chain saws.

Things I Used in This Project:

I just started using a STIHL battery-powered saw, and I’m very impressed with how it compares to my gas-powered units. There are a few situations where I still get out the gas unit, but this battery-powered one is my new go-to in 90% of my tasks.

Let’s get into it.

The first thing to compare right off the bat is the weight. When using gas, I typically run this MS 211 C-BE unit and it weighs in at 10 pounds. This battery-operated MSA 220 C-B weighs in at 11.2 pounds (with battery).

When starting a gas unit you typically have a primer bulb, put it in choke, pull the starter cord, wait for it to turn over, then flip it to “on” and with one or two more pulls,  you’re ready to go.

With a battery, you release the chain brake and squeeze the trigger. That’s it. As long as you have a charged battery, the saw will literally be ready to go whenever you are, whether it be as soon as you bring it home from the dealer or after a long winter of not being used. 

The next thing worth comparing is the noise. I can spend hours stomping around my property doing chain saw work and have just gotten used to the constant rumbling of the engine and the smell of gas. It’s definitely a different experience to pick up the battery-powered saw for use but then have dead silence just a few seconds after I take my finger off the trigger. 

Typically when I’m clearing land, I’ll pick a spot to work on and do a bunch of cutting, then I’ll pause and take time to pull all the down brush out of my way so I can access the next spot.

I normally leave my gas unit idling during this time because it’s a pain to turn off, then turn it back on in five minutes. But with a battery saw, I don’t have to deal with that dilemma to decide if my cutting break is worth turning off my saw. I set it down, then whenever I’m ready, it is, too. 

It’s also very convenient if you’re working with somebody. It’s very easy to pause work and have a conversation without having to get close enough or yell loud enough to talk over engines.

Battery-operated saws still require bar oil, but other than that, no other fluid is needed. That means you can skip mixing oil and gas together or packing your premade mixture.

It also means there are fewer parts to maintain. I don’t know if you’ve ever had to clean the carburetor out because it got gummed up due to lack of maintenance or incorrect storage, but all of that is eliminated since there isn’t a carb on battery-operated saws.

Now let’s talk about the big one: Power. Can a battery-operated saw hold up to jobs that a gas-powered saw can? Let’s do a side-by-side test.

For the test, I first started by cutting some 3-6” diameter branches. 

I then cut some 24” logs.

Gas
Battery

Both saws perform about the same on smaller limbs and branches and while the battery-operated saw didn’t cut the hard pecan quite as quick, it still didn’t struggle with it. But is that spaced few seconds really needed for you? For me, it’s about a job to job evaluation. Do I need to cut two downed pecans or 15? I definitely still have jobs where I reach for my gas unit, but I am finding it less and less since battery-operated saws have become much more equivalent while also having some clear winning features.

A lot of what I do around my property is clear the underbrush or small growing cedars from under my oaks. With that, my battery-operated saw has the power I need so the only thing I manage is run time. If I plan to put in 6-8 hours of cutting, I can certainly use my gas saw for the day and not think about batteries. But if I want the benefits of my battery saw, then I bring two batteries out with me and always have one on the charger. My shop is just through the woods and when I need to place a battery to charge, it’s also a great time to take a much needed break.

Batteries might seem like an expense, but just like any other tool, investing in a platform can also be looked at as a plus. It’s my goal to switch as much of my outdoor power equipment over to battery, including my string trimmer and my leaf blower, so already having the batteries around means they can go towards whatever yard task I set out to do that day. Plus, don’t forget the positive it has on the environment by reducing our carbon footprint.

Conclusion: I think there is definitely a place for both of these units, but with the advancements of battery technology, it is capable of handling the vast majority of the jobs I’m tackling. So if you are looking to get into chain saws, at least consider the battery-operated saws as contenders because I would be willing to bet, they’ll surprise you.

Big thank you to Stihl for supporting my channel and working with me on this video.

The post Gas Vs Battery Chainsaws appeared first on Wilker Do's.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://wilkerdos.com/2020/11/gas-vs-battery-chainsaws/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=gas-vs-battery-chainsaws

2020 Catch Up

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Hellooooo, DIYShowOff friends! I know. I know! “What the heck, Roeshel?!” It’s been a while since I’ve blogged. What a crazy year it’s been, right? I’ve been itching and wanting to get in here to post but … LIFE. You know how it goes. Things have been busy and I’ve been pulled in so many directions (bringing it on myself, do you do that too?) and I’ve neglected my little slice of cyber space. But here I am! I’m ready to catch you up, my faithful followers and friends, my DIY buddies. And gasp! A blog post with no lovely pin-worthy photos this time around but stay tuned because this girl is back! Here’s what’s been going on with me. It’s been a whirlwind!

Wellness Inspired Living – It’s been over 6 years of discovering Young Living and making healthier choices and 3 years ago today (bring on the champagne!), we closed on a property in the city of Butler. It wasn’t in my plans but when opportunity falls into place and things just work out, you go with the flow, right? I wasn’t property shopping or looking and I didn’t stress over it. I stumbled across it. I met with the owner. He was so sweet, so cute and there was a connection over the character and charm in the old building. I told myself if it was meant to be, it’d happen. And it did! #helloredreno was the beginning of creating a space for my wellness and short term rental business and it has been a blessing to so many with educational workshops, a place to support an amazing team with small wellness events and changing lives. It’s a blast! It’s a mission so dear to my heart. I love my circle of oily friends! My love for the roller coaster experience with this amazing network marketing company because making a difference in raising awareness for building a strong immune system is as strong as it ever was! 

Suite Thyme – with Wellness Inspired Living on the main floor, the upstairs was an empty shell of un-utilized space. I knew I wanted to renovate “someday” to create a short term rental where I could host out of town guests and contribute to our small town. My original mindset was much like our house … DIY makeover as time and money allow. Well, you know how that goes. There’s never EVER enough time or money to complete a large scale project and nothing was being accomplished. I think that’s why God introduced me to one of my best of friends, Shelby from Suite Retreat Bed & Biscotti from right across the street. Full of life, motivation and a huge adventurous spirit bigger than life, she gave me the advice and little push to make it happen, to get my butt in gear and a little over a year and a half ago, that empty upstairs shell transformed into Suite Thyme and was listed on AirBnB and VRBO. First year of business is always a little rocky, especially when you throw “lockdown 2020” into the mix but I have to tell you, hosting out of town guests has become one of my favorite things to do! I love being a part of inspiring beautiful memories and making getting away special for others!

Thyme & Mint. Those things inspired some beautiful connections with the creating of personal wellness retreat options. A collection of carefully curated intention collections with The Lunar Fae (my amazing daughter, Evangeline’s etsy shop) providing reiki infused crystals and The Witchn’ Kitchen (a sweet friend who opened up shop on the adjacent corner of Wellness Inspired Living (essential oils) /Suite Thyme) … all things herbal knowledge providing bath soaks, these collections are created with lots of love and personalized intention. We also partnered up to provide options for creating a personal wellness retreat including private yoga sessions by Healing with Amber; crystal healing, guided meditation, sound baths by The Lunar Fae and The Wandering Bramble, Aroma Freedom with Wellness Inspired Living, tea leaf readings and herbal/energy consultations with The Witchn’ Kitchen. We’ve had wonderful positive feedback on the collaboration of these services and put so much care and love into offering up these one on one self care packages. 

WoW. I’ve had the best time getting to know Shelby from Suite Retreat. Down the street is another women owned business, a quaint antique boutique shop called Then & Again and Forever. Wellness Inspired Living and Suite Thyme on another corner. And when The Witchn’ Kitchen opened up along with Bent Oak Plant Co. across the street, and All About ReClaimed, — a boutique/wellness/shopping/lodging district was born! We call ourselves Butler Women of Washington (our street) or WoW and are on a mission to support women owned business, work together providing fun vendor events and local festivals and to inspire revitalization in our community. 

Oh! And I’ve been having the time of my life helping with designs on a new short term rental space. Simply helping a friend with decorating and design decisions and it’s starting to come together. I know I’m going to want to LIVE there. It’s unfolding into this beautiful magical happily ever after makeover story. I plan on sharing some crazy before and after about it as soon as it’s ready. Exciting! 

So whew! A lot going on, right? 

And you know my heart is filled with so much love for my grandson and you guys! He’s turning 6 years old already this month! SIX! Time is just flying by! Know what else? He’s getting a brother in less than 2 months!!! This mother of two girls is going to be a grandmother to two boys! I am so excited! I am so blessed! I can’t wait!

2020 is also the year I turned 50. Oh.my.goodness. A big milestone that’s gotten pushed aside. A lot of reflection. A lot of gratitude. March 2020 didn’t allow for a big celebration. We haven’t felt comfortable booking a celebratory travel destination either. But I’m looking forward to finishing out the year on a positive happy vibe and making the 5th decade of my story the best chapter yet! 

Okay. Back to DIYShowOff. With so much going on, I’ve neglected my passion for maintaining a beautiful home. Projects half finished, rooms cluttered and un-used, things feeling blah and boring. I miss surrounding myself with cozy comfort, seeing my home as my favorite safe haven and have a new desire to freshen things up and to resume my DIY lovin’ habits. Maybe a little ‘nesting’ with a new grand-baby on the way (?) but I am SO ready to dive in and get things done!

First up I’ve been working to downsize my closet. You guys, there are still professional work clothes from at least 10 years ago hanging untouched in the dressing room. And my craft room? It’s like a sealed vault. I haven’t opened that door in well over a year or more. We have a man cave creation in progress that’s been on hold. And remember one of my very first DIY makeovers…that bathroom with the painted floor? It’s time to give it some grown up DIY with tile! 

Time to clear out the clutter that’s weighing me down. There’s no two week tropical vacation in our December this year (boo) so I’ve decided to move full speed ahead into creating an in-home oasis. For me that means, out with the things that no longer serve us and changing up rooms to utilize and make the most of our entire home. Those early DIYShowOff room makeovers are feeling old and tired and I’m ready for some good old budget friendly DIY to change things up!

What’s new with you? I’m so ready and so happy to get re-acquainted and can’t wait to see what’s new with you! 

 

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://diyshowoff.com/2020/11/17/2020-catch-up/

How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home

How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home

Downsizing from 3200 square feet to 1400 means storage is a big deal to us these days, and a couple of weeks ago we got two major upgrades in that department. We still have some “hacking” to do to the simple Ikea cabinets that we bought, but we’re stupidly giddy over just having them assembled and installed. They basically add up to 8 more large cabinets worth of storage – and our kitchen only has 7 cabinets, so the excitement was palpable when those flat-packed boxes arrived (they had about a 4 week wait time, but otherwise delivery was smooth and uneventful for those wondering how the ordering experience was during this time period).

ottomans | similar woven bench | TV media cabinet / blue basket next to TV

They make a HUGE difference in how much we can store – literally, it’s like we added a closet… except it’s in the form of three different large cabinets around the house.

Continue reading How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home at Young House Love.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://www.younghouselove.com/ikea-besta-storage-solution/

How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home

How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home

Downsizing from 3200 square feet to 1400 means storage is a big deal to us these days, and a couple of weeks ago we got two major upgrades in that department. We still have some “hacking” to do to the simple Ikea cabinets that we bought, but we’re stupidly giddy over just having them assembled and installed. They basically add up to 8 more large cabinets worth of storage – and our kitchen only has 7 cabinets, so the excitement was palpable when those flat-packed boxes arrived (they had about a 4 week wait time, but otherwise delivery was smooth and uneventful for those wondering how the ordering experience was during this time period).

ottomans | similar woven bench | TV media cabinet / blue basket next to TV

They make a HUGE difference in how much we can store – literally, it’s like we added a closet… except it’s in the form of three different large cabinets around the house.

Continue reading How We Added Some Much-Needed Storage To Our Smaller Home at Young House Love.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://www.younghouselove.com/ikea-besta-storage-solution/

How To Make Prints From A Tree Ring

I made some custom artwork for my house by turning a tree stump into a stamp and imprinting the growth rings on a sheet of paper. Let me show you how I did it.

Things I Used in This Project:

I first grabbed a tree from my property. This is mesquite. It had been cut with a chainsaw. And while not too rough, the surface wasn’t perfectly flat. So I used my Triton Belt Sander to work on getting it flat. However, while it was working, it was taking a bit too long.

So I decided to take down the bulk of the unevenness with my Triton Electric Planer instead. I originally used my small planer to hit the high spots. Then after getting the surface roughly down to the same level, I switched to using my larger Triton 7″ Planer.

Then, after a few passes with the belt sander again, I had a smooth surface that was nice and flat. It’s important to get a nice flat surface so that your paper can hit everywhere on the stump and transfer the ring pattern.

So now the stump is nice and smooth. But in order to make the print work, you need high and low spots. When looking at a tree ring there are portions that are soft wood and hard wood. The idea to make a stump into a stamp is to use heat to slightly burn away the soft wood so that the harder rings are pronounced.

I decided to upgrade to my propane bottle torch to speed up the process. I was aiming to get a nice and even burn without charing the surface.

Afterwards, I used a wire brush to remove the debris I created. If you can run your fingers over the surface and feel the distinct tree rings, then you’ve done enough.

Then I let the stump fully cool down because up next is applying ink and you dont want the stump to be hot when doing so.

I’d first use a spray bottle and wet down the surface of the stump. This will help the paint from soaking in and instead remain on the surface. I’m using acrylic ink and applied it using a foam roller.

After making sure the entire surface was coated, I lined up my paper and set it in place, being careful not to shift it side to side once it was down.

I would then carefully peel the paper up from the stump to reveal the outcome. Pretty neat!

I was having so much fun with the process that I decided to make some more, playing with the amount of ink I used. I found that if you used too much ink, the image came out smudged looking. And if you don’t apply too much, the image comes out faded and the paper sticks to the stump.

Once I had the process down, I started playing with color. I used water to rinse in between colors. Then I’d apply a new color and play.

Then, after the prints were fully dry, I placed them in a frame and hung them up. Now I have some custom artwork in my house that I absolutely love.

Be sure to watch the video for an even better tutorial. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed this one. I will see you on my next project!

If you haven’t already, don’t forget to sign up at the top of this page for my newsletter so you don’t miss new projects!

(Most of the links listed above are affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for supporting me in this way.)

The post How To Make Prints From A Tree Ring appeared first on Wilker Do's.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://wilkerdos.com/2020/11/how-to-make-prints-from-a-tree-ring/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-make-prints-from-a-tree-ring

Live Edge Floating Shelves | How To Build

In this tutorial I’m going to show you how I made these floating live edge wood shelves. It’s a very simple process but can turn any wall space into something visually unique but also functional. Lets get into the process. 

Things I Used in This Project:

I’m starting off with a walnut slab that had a good amount of bug tracks on one end and a deep but beautiful bark inclusion on the other. I think features like these give the shelves character so I intentionally chose a board that wasn’t flawless. 

However, since there are so many cavities I went ahead and starting the process by first filling them with clear epoxy. I flipped the board over to what will be the bottom of the shelves then started taping off any and all cracks or holes I saw.

After getting a good amount of coverage over any, I used a pencil to press the tape down firmly. Leaking epoxy is not fun, however you also see I laid down some cardboard on my workbench before getting starting. 

Now for the end I went with something a little bit more thick than painters tape, I did four layers of duct tape to try and build up a dam on this side. I just need something to keep the epoxy from spilling over once I start pouring it in the voids.

Even after a few layers of tape though, I knew it wouldn’t hold so I next grabbed a thin scrap that had some flex to it and screwed it into the end. Making sure it took the curve of the slab. Then the last thing I did before pouring was clear out all the dust and dreby from the voids. 

If you don’t want to go through all this work of pouring epoxy then know you can skip this step. With these being shelves, there wouldn’t have been anything wrong with leaving them as is. I just like the look that clear epoxy gives the surface. 

Before pouring, I like to raise the slab off the workbench so I can check for leaks along the way.  I grabbed a few bench cookies from my dispenser and set them on either end of my slab. 

For epoxy I’m going with my go to brand of epoxy which is Total Boat. Here I’m using Total Boat High Performance. This stuff is crystal clear, is a simple 2:1 ratio, and dries pretty quick.

I poured this in the morning, let it sit overnight, then was ready to start sanding the next morning.

Be sure to read the mixing time and stick to it when using epoxy and also make sure to have a flame on hand so after you pour, you can use the heat to remove all the air bubbles. I typically keep a small torch in my shop for this reason but couldn’t find it and tried using a regular lighter. It makes the fingers a little toasty since it’s so close so I went with the only other heat option I had around which was my mega torch. : ) Ha, it’s overkill but a quick spritz and all the bubbles were gone. 

Be sure to overfill any voids because in the next step you sand it, and you want the surface of the epoxy to come out flush with the surrounding wood after.

Also if you’re needing epoxy remember I have a 15% off coupon code on anything Total Boat if you use the code AprilW at checkout. 

Ok after letting that sit up overnight it was sanding time. I wheeled my shop vac and separator cart into place, hooked up my Triton ROS and started the process. I always start with 60 grit sand paper to take down the bulk of dried epoxy. I also prefer to use my larger ROS since I have one but a belt sander would also take it down quickly. 

After getting it flush, I switched over to my palm ROS and then ran through the grits, going over  the entire slab at the same time.

As I ran through the grits, going from 60 to 100, to 150, to 220, to 320, to 400……I would really focus on hitting the epoxy portions to remove as many scratches as possible so that in the end it would be crystal clear in the ending results. I like to use a little mineral spirits to get a sense on how it will look with finish on it. 

When I’m happy with the results, I move on! Hitting the entire edge with my sander, then wiping it all down to prep to applying finish. I’m testing out a new finish called walrus oil on this project and found it very simple. Of course it makes the walnut just absolutely pop as soon as it’s spread on. I always start off with finishing the bottom of projects first then flip them over to do the show face before letting the entire thing set up to dry. 

BTW: even though these will be five separate shelves, it’s much easier to do all of these steps with the board as one big unit rather than working with five smaller pieces. 

So after letting the finish dry, I then started marking out my shelves boundaries on the slab. I’m using a soapstone pencil and my track saw guide to draw out where I think the shelves should be so I can make sure I like the visual of them before actually making a cut. I wanted the shelves that will be most at visual level to be the ones with the most character in them, so the large bark inclusion and the bug tracks.

Once I was happy with the layout, I hopped up on my workbench and used my Triton track saw to start making some cuts.

The track saw is great to get straight cuts on a natural shape like this that doesn’t have a straight edge reference to start. However, I’m using almost every inch of this slab and couldn’t over cut my lines so I would sneak up to the corner with the saw as close as I could, then finish it off with a hand saw. 

Once I broke down the slab a bit using that method, I was then able to take the remaining slab and pieces to the table saw and use my Rockler Cross cut sled to finish it off.

Oh yeah, that’s gonna be cool I think. I not only cut up the rest of the slab but I also used my sled to get all of the edges at a perfect 90 and the shelves to final length. 

The Shelf Hardware I’m going with can be found at Rockler.

It comes with a rectangular mounting bracket that will butt up to the back of the shelf. I like to cut in a small recess on the shelf so the back will sit flush up again the wall when it’s mounted. After marking off the placement of the two brackets, I used a straight bit in my router table to carve this recess out. Test fitting the bracket afterwards to make sure it would comfortably fit. 

With the bracket cavity cut in, now I just needed to drill the holes for the hardware. With it being a live edge and so tall, using a drill press isn’t an option so instead I’m using a new drilling guide from Rockler.

It’s pretty much a portable drill press and has quickly gone up the list of one of my favorite things. This quill here can be chucked up in a drill and travel up and down. There are two stops that can be placed anywhere in order to regulate the desired depth. It has onboard storage for a chuck key, and even a tilting feature so you can drill straight but at an angle. Tell me that isn’t cool.

There are also two pins that have on board storage at the top that can be screwed into the bottom. These can be set on the edge of any piece of wood to help you quickly find center of that edge.

I could have used this feature to drill my holes, but instead I used the mounting holes in the drilling guides deck to secure it horizontally to my armor tool workbench. I locked all four casters to keep it from moving around on me, and just felt like this was a bit more secure for the depth of hole I was going after. 

I would line up the shelf so that the center of the mounting bracket recess was in line with the center of the drilling guide’s bit, then plunge. After drilling the depth needed for the first, I would move the shelf over and repeat on the second. After knocking out one shelf, I repeated on the remaining four. 

Hanging the shelves is very easy. I started off by first measuring out the height I wanted each shelf then used a level to draw a straight line across.

Now the mounting bracket can be held up into place and the first screw sunk to secure it. After getting the first screw set, I used the level again to make sure it was level before driving in the second screw. Once the first bracket was attached, I used the level to make sure the second bracket went in the same. 

The top two holes are for mounting the bracket, the third is for a set screw to be inserted so that a metal rod can be threaded on. This is what will go into the holes I drilled in the back of the shelves.

Rockler has two versions of this mounting hardware: this one that is rated at 50lbs (which is still a lot), or Heavy Duty Supports that can support up to 125lbs.  

For my shelves, I went with a staggered look. I don’t know what I’ll end up storing here in the end but no matter what it is, the shelves definitely took this bare space and turned it into something more interesting and beautiful. All from a slab I grabbed from The Wood Shed as well. 

I was about to call this project done when I decided to add in a hidden feature….just for you loyal viewers. I quickly grabbed a few more scraps and threw together a simple and tiny drawer to mount on the bottom side of the lower most shelf.

In this drawer, I will always keep a few stickers and if you ever come to The Wood Shed in person, please feel free to help yourself to this secret stash. 

Ok, and that really does wrap up this project. Big thank you to Rockler for sponsoring this video and supporting what I do.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this Live Edge Floating Shelf project. Be sure and watch the video for an even better tutorial! And I’ll see you on whatever I’m working on next. 

If you haven’t already, don’t forget to sign up at the top of this page for my newsletter so you don’t miss new projects!

(Most of the links listed above are affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for supporting me in this way.)

The post Live Edge Floating Shelves | How To Build appeared first on Wilker Do's.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://wilkerdos.com/2020/11/live-edge-floating-shelves-how-to-build/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=live-edge-floating-shelves-how-to-build

Our Front Porch: Big Plans & Even Bigger Plants

Our Front Porch: Big Plans & Even Bigger Plants

It has been about five months since we first introduced you to the outside of our house. That was our very first week of living here, and our outdoor spaces have been getting a lot of use ever since. You’ve already seen how our second-story deck has come together, so today we wanted to update you on our front porch as well as the covered area that we call the side porch and some new landscaping that we’ve added too.

We’ve made some functional and organizational improvements, some strictly aesthetic enhancements, and have some other upgrades that are still in the works. So won’t you join us on the front porch? Here’s how it’s looking these days:

house numbers | white plant pots | porch light | similar woven egg chair | similar blue-green planter

This next picture was a photo from back in May, when it was basically just our existing furniture and a couple of plants plopped down to make the space feel occupied.

Continue reading Our Front Porch: Big Plans & Even Bigger Plants at Young House Love.

from Home Improvements Articles and News https://www.younghouselove.com/front-porch-plants-update/